Membership Relations

Current Members

We are currently able to conduct business in these African countries:

Benin
Burundi
Democratic Republic of Congo
Ethiopia
Kenya
Madagascar
Malawi
Rwanda
Tanzania
Uganda
Zambia
Zimbabwe

 

We will regularly update this list as new members complete the membership process. 


Other Members

African Development Bank
African Reinsurance Corporation
Atradius Group
SACE
The Common Market of Eastern and Southern Africa (COMESA)
The Eastern and Southern African Trade and Development Bank (PTA Bank)
The PTA Re Insurance Company (Zep Re)
UK Export Finance

Overview

ATI insurance products are making a difference in African member countries. ATI policies are helping to build key infrastructure such as telecommunications and power generation in both rural and urban communities. ATI products are also helping to protect agricultural and textile exporters against non-payment by their international and regional buyers, to construct housing in urban communities, and to support the growth of small and medium-sized enterprises.

ATI has facilitated a variety of transactions in multiple sectors, which are supporting the economic development of African countries.

Become A Member

Who is eligible? 
Membership in ATI is open to the following:

All African states that are eligible to join the African Union
Non-African states or organisations designated to represent them
Regional economic organisations
International development financial institutions
Export credit agencies
Private corporations

What are the membership categories?
You can join our Agency at four different shareholder levels:

Country membership, African states (Class A Shareholder)
Country membership, Non-African states(Class B Shareholder)
Private corporations(Class C Shareholder)
Regional economic organisations and export credit agencies
(Class D Shareholder)
International Development Financial Institutions
(Class E Shareholder)

How are the shares divided?
The capital stock structure of ATI is open-ended and is based on an initial authorised nominal capital stock of
US$ 1 billion divided into 10,000 shares with a par value of US$100,000. Members are able to subscribe for shares in ATI based on their shareholding category. 

There are five available shareholder classes in which members can purchase stock. These classes are categorised according to the following criteria: 

  » Class "A"
Shares which are open to African states. This class must at all times represent a minimum of 51% of ATI's capital stock. A minimum share subscription of 75 shares is required to join at this level. 

The level of investments by African member states in ATI will determine the amount of business that the Agency can support in the relevant country. 

  » Class "B" 
Shares which are open to non-African states or their designates. A minimum share subscription of 100 shares is required to join at this level. 

  » Class "C" 
Shares which are open to private corporations. A minimum share subscription of 100 shares is required to join at this level. 

  » Class "D" 
Shares which are open to regional economic organisations and export credit agencies. A minimum share subscription of 1 share is required to join at this level.  

  » Class "E" 
Shares which are open to International Development Financial Institutions. A minimum subscription of 100 shares is required to join at this level.

 Here is a step-by-step explanation of what happens after you submit your application for membership: 

Class A Shareholders (Country membership, African states)

Application Step 1
The General Meeting, comprised of all the members of ATI, will approve your application to membership at their Annual General Meeting. 
In order to speed up the membership process, the Board has been delegated the authority to admit any African state. 

Application Step 2
Once your application has been approved by either the General Meeting or Board of Directors, you will be invited to sign the Agreement Establishing ATI, which is the Agency's Charter, and the Participation Agreement. 

Application Step 3
The Agreement is then ratified by parliament or the legal arm of a government. 

Application Step 4 
African and non-African states, corporations and organisations must subscribe and pay for their respective allotted shares. 
The acquired shares will be proportionate with the member's desired level of investment but subject to the minimum investment for the relevant class of share in accordance with the provisions of the ATI Charter. This allows each member to become a shareholder and obtain official representation at the General Assembly and on the Board of Directors. 

Class B, C,D and E Shareholders

Application Step 1
The General Meeting, comprised of all the members of ATI, will approve your application to membership at their Annual General Meeting. 

Application Step 2
African and non-African states, corporations and organisations must subscribe and pay for their respective allotted shares. 
The acquired shares will be proportionate with the member's desired level of investment but subject to the minimum investment for the relevant class of share in accordance with the provisions of the ATI Charter. This allows each member to become a shareholder and obtain official representation at the General Assembly and on the Board of Directors. 

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Benefits of Membership

ATI insurance products are making a difference in African member countries. ATI policies are helping to build key infrastructure such as telecommunications and power generation in both rural and urban communities. ATI products are also helping to protect agricultural and textile exporters against non-payment by their international and regional buyers, to construct housing in urban communities, and to support the growth of small and medium-sized enterprises.

ATI has facilitated a variety of transactions in multiple sectors, which are supporting the economic development of African countries.

Sample transactions covered by ATI: 

Energy -A multilateral insurer supporting an investor in a geothermal energy plant seeks ATI reinsurance to protect against the risks of currency transfer restrictions, expropriation and potential damage or interruptions to the project in the event of war or civil disturbance.
Floricultural Exports - A Flower producer uses ATI's Whole Turnover Credit Risk insurance to protect her sales against the risk of buyer payment default in an expanded export market that includes 13 countries located in Europe, the Middle East and Asia.&nbs
Telecommunications -An international telecommunications company contracted to design supply, construct and install cellular base station sites obtains ATI's comprehensive non-payment insurance to protect against non-payment by a private buyer before entering into the contract.
Tourism - A South African lender obtains ATI's foreign direct investment insurance to protect his investment in the construction of an international hotel chain.

ATI insurance levels the playing field to allow African exporters to compete globally. With credit insurance, exporters are able to sell on short-term credit rather than cash terms, allowing them to offer goods to buyers on competitive terms.

The global economic downturn has decreased access to project financing. ATI insurance products have enabled project sponsors to more easily mobilize financing because the policies provide lenders with confidence to enter into markets, where they will be protected against political or credit-related risks.

For private corporations, membership can translate into increased access to African markets and to reliable intelligence on the credit worthiness of potential partners in both the private and public sectors within Africa or globally.

Overview

ATI insurance products are making a difference in African member countries. ATI policies are helping to build key infrastructure such as telecommunications and power generation in both rural and urban communities. ATI products are also helping to protect agricultural and textile exporters against non-payment by their international and regional buyers, to construct housing in urban communities, and to support the growth of small and medium-sized enterprises.

ATI has facilitated a variety of transactions in multiple sectors, which are supporting the economic development of African countries.

These transactions include:

An international telecommunications company contracted to design supply, construct and install cellular base station sites obtains ATI's comprehensive non-payment insurance to protect against non-payment by a private buyer before entering into the contract.

Energy - A multilateral insurer supporting an investor in a geothermal energy plant seeks ATI reinsurance to protect against the risks of currency transfer restrictions, expropriation and potential damage or interruptions to the project in the event of war or civil disturbance.

Floricultural Exports - A Flower producer uses ATI's Whole Turnover Credit Risk insurance to protect her sales against the risk of buyer payment default in an expanded export market that includes 13 countries located in Europe, the Middle East and Asia.

Tourism - A South African lender obtains ATI's foreign direct investment insurance to protect his investment in the construction of an international hotel chain.

ATI insurance levels the playing field to allow African exporters to compete globally. With credit insurance, exporters are able to sell on short-term credit rather than cash terms, allowing them to offer goods to buyers on competitive terms.

The global economic downturn has decreased access to project financing. ATI insurance products have enabled project sponsors to more easily mobilize financing because the policies provide lenders with confidence to enter into markets, where they will be protected against political or credit-related risks.

For private corporations, membership can translate into increased access to African markets and to reliable intelligence on the credit worthiness of potential partners in both the private and public sectors within Africa or globally.

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